Is the S (Sharing) in CALMS Redundant?

@MLCarey321 asked a interesting question on Twitter the other day – is the S for Sharing in the CALMS model not redundant? If you have the right culture that emphasises collaboration & “no silos” surely “sharing” flows out of that? 

TwitterQuote

My view is that from a cultural perspective he’s probably right, a DevOps Culture definitely should encompass “sharing” as a core value so why do we need the extra S? 

CALMS Model of DevOps

I think that the extra S is there to emphasise that just having “sharing” as a core value isn’t enough – you need to actively put in place mechanisms to promote, facilitate and reward sharing at multiple levels

For example here at DevOpsGuys we:

  1. Heavily use Atlassian Confluence as a wiki for documentation and documentation is seen as a “living thing” that must be kept up to date because it has value to the team every day.
  2. Use HipChat for informal communication, “What am I doing now”, “Does anyone know something about topic xyz” etc. HipChat is also integrated with JIRA, PagerDuty, CI/CD. 
  3. JIRA Kanban boards for sharing “this is what the team / individual is working on how”, plus time-tracking and work status. 
  4. All of the 3 above are also accessible by the clients – so sharing means “sharing with the customer” too, not creating an “us&them” silo. 
  5. Blogging and presenting to share with the community is strongly encouraged and we’ve started a meetup group DevOps Cardiff (in addition to London Web Performance that I’ve run for 3 years)
  6. Our GitHub repo is a bit sparse at the moment but we hope to open-source some stuff in the future, particularly some samples around Powershell DSC

As we grow and we bring on more grads & apprentices everyone will be paired with a senior mentor to ensure that skills & experience are shared across team, and we’ll start doing weekly “brown-bag” session to further share knowledge.

One area we haven’t looked at yet is explicitly promoting sharing via an incentive/bonus scheme based on “# blog posts” or “# open source commits” or “StackOverflow Reputation“, mostly because I’ve never seen it work successfully in previous organisations in which I’ve worked.

That’s not to say it can’t work… but you have to think about it very carefully or otherwise you risk incentivising the wrong behaviour. My feeling at the moment is that this will remain “ad-hoc” when someone shares “something cool” or gets accepted to speak at a conference or something.

How do you promote, facilitate and reward sharing in your organisations? 

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